everdreamingheart:

J.K. Rowling should have published The Cuckoo’s Calling under the pseudonym Mark Winjiglo and then revealed in a very Tom Riddle-esque way that it is actually an anagram that says, “I am J.K. Rowling.”

(Source: englishh-rose)

I’ve heard a great deal about you, Fa Mulan. You stole your father’s armor, ran away from home, impersonated a soldier, deceived your commanding officer, dishonored the Chinese Army, destroyed my palace, and… you have saved us all.

(Source: caryjojifukunaga)

Q: Hi Ginaaaa :D I'm like your resident lurker who decides to pop in with a question like once every year lol. Anywhooos . . . I was wondering if you ever get to use your art skills (at?in?) work? Or is it mostly only like the stuff mentioned in the tumblr intern post? Let me know if this didn't make any sense haha. I can try to clarify :) Have a wonderful day! *sankavi out*

I do! Not very prominently, but because I work in a small team in a startup-like environment (i.e. fast-paced + burst workloads), I get to take on multiple roles and touch many different areas of development, including the design of the site. I help brainstorm, make suggestions that sometimes get immediately implemented, and tweak designs when what we get back from the creative team doesn’t work with what we have.

I actually don’t want to work too heavily with design, because it’s something I know I can’t work well with in a team (I cannot deal with other people’s tastes nor business requirements lol it would give me an aneurysm). Ultimately, I am an engineer, and 90% of what I do is code-related. But when I make the web pages, design is in the back of my mind. I know what good UI is like, how to best compromise design elements that don’t end up working, how to spot potential problems, etc. I got very lucky with my current job, because I could have very easily been placed on a team that didn’t need a front-end engineer nor so much design work. image

I have not! I have even less time this year :’) As always, I’d like to just write something.


@jojomoyes First pic of Sam Claflin & Emilia Clarke reading as Will & Lou. Like they just jumped out of my head. #mebeforeyou (x)

@jojomoyes First pic of Sam Claflin & Emilia Clarke reading as Will & Lou. Like they just jumped out of my head. #mebeforeyou (x)


Sam Claflin as Alistair Ryle in The Riot Club [x]

Sam Claflin as Alistair Ryle in The Riot Club [x]

(Source: samclaflin-fans)

(Source: donniedarkos)


If there's a fire, do you think I'll burn? [x] 
If there's a fire, do you think I'll burn? [x
A twee niceness is snark’s mirror image, more pleasant, but as a guiding principle, almost as vacant. Niceness is an affect, a surface level tendency. A lot of the gamblers on Wall Street who wrecked a generation’s economy are really nice bros. Some of the soldiers shelling schools in Gaza are probably teddy bears around their families. The twee boys running our college newspapers might be really polite as they discount women’s opinions. Niceness doesn’t necessarily speak to any deeper commitment to justice. In fact, it can be used to gloss over it.
— Travis Mushett looks at the limits of twee/indie culture, only at Blunderbuss Magazine.

(Source: blunderbussmag)

softerworld:

A Softer World: 1129
(there’s meaning as long as there’s someone to need it)
buy this print

softerworld:

A Softer World: 1129

(there’s meaning as long as there’s someone to need it)

buy this print

(Source: allinye)

Fan fiction is a way of the culture repairing the damage done in a system where contemporary myths are owned by corporations instead of by the folk.
— Henry Jenkins (Director of media studies at MIT)

(Source: quotesofquotes)

image

image

My personal experience has been positive. I think the attitudes of the school and the professors make up a huge part of shaping the student culture. Where you are and where you go will make a big difference, and this is about university and jobs in general, so do your research! You can be absolutely miserable in one school and happy in another, just because of the social/cultural environments. The computer science department where I studied is way different from even those in nearby universities. We have a very active comp sci women club which I was an officer in, officers in many other engineering and comp sci clubs are balanced in gender, and the professors are very adamant about promoting women in the major. Still, only 15% of CS graduates are women, despite entry classes having over twice that percentage (there’s a steep dropoff during second year), and I believe there’s a similar percentage of women developers where I work. I have not been treated differently because of my gender, at least in an obvious way.

I find that tech is one of the more progressive and articulate cultures, though it’s not without its blunders. It’s a merit-based culture—you are judged by your skills—which has its own problems. Intelligence may be perceived as genderless, but I think women are underestimated. I think women have to prove themselves more before their intelligence is accepted. I think women have to adapt to male-dominated culture that targets males and assumes she is a male, without the promise of equal understanding in return. I think women have to adapt to a culture that they were not raised for or encouraged to pursue, because there are so few role models for them growing up, because well-portrayed female nerds are still incredibly rare on screen. I think women who want leadership positions will face the same discrimination that all assertive women face in being viewed more negatively than her male peers. I think women struggle with their mistakes and shortcomings in a way men don’t have to—in a way that is gendered, because when she makes mistakes, she is used to people blaming and generalizing her gender for that mistake.

And especially it’s a merit-based culture, there will be people questioning women-exclusive scholarships and events, crying unfairness because they believe we’re on an even playing field when we aren’t. When so much of the culture is pushing against us even if it isn’t intentional. When we are shamed for speaking up because they assumes that we want special treatment. When we may be afraid of speaking up because we also want to be accepted.

My personal experience has been positive, but I recognize these problems exist and moreso for some women than others. The most disheartening thing is when I hear women like me say things like, “I don’t understand why women feel disadvantaged; they’re exaggerating.” Just because I don’t have these problems doesn’t mean others don’t. It doesn’t devalue their struggles. It doesn’t mean the other women just weren’t “good” enough to overcome them; these problems exist and they shouldn’t have to overcome them.

That all sounds very negative, but when it comes down to it, on a day to day basis, you’ll experience little of what I mentioned above. Your peers will most likely be cool and nerdy and not at all discriminating. I only mention so much of the above because these problems exist despite the rhetoric, but they are also problems that exist anywhere you go. You’ll find people will agree that we need more women in computing. We need people who understand women building apps, sites, robots for women, because representation in tech like representation in the media — we need to normalize women’s needs and women’s experiences. I think it’s an excellent culture to be part of, especially for our generation—practically necessary, really. I hope this isn’t discouraging!

me: bee-zul-bub
bf: be-el-zuh-bub?
me: I don't want to remember all the syllables.


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